Confederate flag a symbol of history

Bubba Hall participates in Civil War reenactments, marching as a shoeless soldier to give onlookers a glimpse of how bad southern soldiers had it.
Bubba Hall participates in Civil War reenactments, marching as a shoeless soldier to give onlookers a glimpse of how bad southern soldiers had it.

Not everyone is happy to see the Confederate flag displayed in plain sight, but Corbin resident, Bubba Hall, says not one person has ever complained to his face.

“There have been negative comments made on the web, but I ignore them for the cowards that they are,” said Hall. “If someone wants to know why I fly the flag, all they have to do is ask me. It’s not for the reasons these cyber bullies are trying to make everyone believe.”

Austin Hall, or Bubba to everyone who knows him, and his family have proudly flown the Confederate flag in their front lawn for more than 15 years. The family lives on US 25S, and the Confederate flag, along with a homemade cannon created by Hall’s dad, Harold, are displayed a mere 20 yards off the highway.

People call me a racist and a bigot because I fly the Confederate flag,” said Hall, “but the truth is I’m a Son of the Confederate Veterans and a Civil War reenactor. I’m not hiding behind a flag. I’m proud of my southern heritage.

A confederate flag and a homemade cannon are on display at Hall's home in Corbin.
A confederate flag and a homemade cannon are on display at Hall’s home in Corbin.

Hall’s ancestry traces back to his great-great uncle, John Messer, of the 37th Virginia Company D, who fought in the War Between the States. Although Messer was actually from Tennessee, he fought with the state of Virginia because Tennessee had not at that time yet seceded from the Union.

The Halls can trace their family lineage all the way back to 1640 when their early ancestors came across the ocean from Scotland and England, and the family even has census reports dating back to the 1840s.

So, when Hall flies a Confederate flag, he is making a statement, a statement that says he will not forget, nor let others forget, those who died in that terrible war. Even as a Civil War reenactor, Hall often marches shoeless in order to give people a glimpse of just how bad the southern soldiers had it; the soldiers, he said, that would sometimes have to march as much as 20 miles at a time and then fight a battle, often without any covering for their feet.

Bubba Hall became interested in his family’s heritage when he was still a child. At only nine years old, the young boy began reenacting as a Civil War soldier, and he has been searching and recording his family’s history since he was in the seventh grade.

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“I love my southern heritage,” said Hall. “The Confederate soldiers were only fighting for what they believed in at the time. They were fighting against a government they felt was treating them like garbage. The flag I fly represents the courage and the will my ancestors had to stand up against that government.”

And now, Bubba Hall is about to take another stand. With the support of the Sons of the Confederate Veterans, Hall plans to lead a rally on July 24 at the capital in Frankfort to protest the removal of the statue of Jefferson Davis from the capital rotunda.

“This is crazy,” said Hall. “Jefferson Davis is a Kentuckian through and through and a true war hero. I just don’t understand why anyone would want to take him out of the capital? Do they really think they can change or erase history simply by moving a statue?”