independent governor candidate visits Barbourville

Photo by Emily Baker Drew Curtis, independent candidate for Kentucky state governor, speaks to the Cumberland Valley chapter of Kentucky Public Retirees.
Photo by Emily Baker
Drew Curtis, independent candidate for Kentucky state governor, speaks to the Cumberland Valley chapter of Kentucky Public Retirees.

Independent candidate for Kentucky State Governor, Drew Curtis, paid a visit to Barbourville Tuesday to speak at the annual picnic of the Cumberland Valley chapter of Kentucky Public Retirees at Thompson Park.

Curtis is the founder and sole owner of Fark.com, a news-aggregation website that Curtis explains as “what happens when the Daily Show runs into the Drudge Report.”

Curtis emphasized that his motives behind running were purely genuine and out of concern for the state.

“I am not a politician,” explained Curtis, “I decided to run mostly because I was challenged by my friends. I complained about Kentucky’s current situation and the lack of effort by those in power, and my friends said, ‘Well, why don’t you run?’”

Curtis’ running platform concerns state pensions.

During his speech he said, “If we don’t do something about the current pension situation, the state will be bankrupt in two years.”

His solution? Restructure the entire pension infrastructure.

Curtis explained, “Rather than owing money to individuals, we should transfer liability to banks as needed. In this way, the state accrues less interest on its debt.”

Curtis also plans on making subtle changes to the current licensing system. He insists the changes will be made, “with the least amount of disruption possible.”

If elected, he plans on moving toward on-line government. For example, rather than waiting in line at the DMV to renew your drivers license, one could simply visit a website and renew digitally.

According to Curtis, this shouldn’t result in job loss within the government. Instead, individuals would be reassigned to a separate department that is short-handed.

He said, “the best way to cut the size of government is to just not let it grow.”

Although he, along with his wife and running mate, Heather Curtis, have only been on the ballot since Aug. 7, Curtis is optimistic.

He said, “I have received a lot of support, and I believe we still have a shot.”