Stinking Creek News, Where is Home

“I’ll be home for Christmas.” So where is home? I have lived four score and six years and have learned to make several places “my home.”
I was born in a log cabin on the crest of a small hill. And loved that place as a child until I was twelve when we moved down the road a bit to a larger house and farm.
So in my teen years I lived with my family of six and grew to love it there. I thought I would always live there, but I went away to college and straight to Kentucky after college.
Then in 1958 Peggy and I joined forces and formed a community center on Stinking Creek. We soon made that old farm house a home for ourselves, volunteers and our Lend-A-Hand children. We not only outgrew that house but the floods and time had eroded it past living, so we built a larger Center for our home back up from the creek on the hillside. It was indeed a challenge to create a family and home with everyone having different last names and parents. We were determined to make it a home in spite of the coming and going of the family members. We not only built the physical structure but created a homey place where people could dream of coming home to. It really isn’t the structure but the people inside that make it a home and a home where people want to come home to.
My next home was a challenge indeed. A three-room, old cabin that had seen better days, with no electricity, central heat, running water (I often joked it was “walking” water because I was too tired to run with the bucket), no telephone and not even a road. We soon built a nice “path room.” That was my dream home for thirteen years until we moved into a twenty-two room, three story house with four complete bathrooms for the next fifteen years. I loved those two houses. This time we created a home for sojourners called a Bed and Breakfast.
All of these years the work at Lend-a-Hand Center was my day job. Finally in 2005 circumstances called me back to moving the three-room cabin to The Center and create a comfortable house. “So Much” soon became my dream house, but I really liked each house and hated to move away. Now it seems time to return to the home community in Indiana, not to my childhood house, but certainly my childhood church and family. So this year the song, “I’ll be home for Christmas” takes on new meaning for me.

“I’ll be home for Christmas.” So where is home? I have lived four score and six years and have learned to make several places “my home.”
I was born in a log cabin on the crest of a small hill. And loved that place as a child until I was twelve when we moved down the road a bit to a larger house and farm.
So in my teen years I lived with my family of six and grew to love it there. I thought I would always live there, but I went away to college and straight to Kentucky after college.
Then in 1958 Peggy and I joined forces and formed a community center on Stinking Creek. We soon made that old farm house a home for ourselves, volunteers and our Lend-A-Hand children. We not only outgrew that house but the floods and time had eroded it past living, so we built a larger Center for our home back up from the creek on the hillside. It was indeed a challenge to create a family and home with everyone having different last names and parents. We were determined to make it a home in spite of the coming and going of the family members. We not only built the physical structure but created a homey place where people could dream of coming home to. It really isn’t the structure but the people inside that make it a home and a home where people want to come home to.
My next home was a challenge indeed. A three-room, old cabin that had seen better days, with no electricity, central heat, running water (I often joked it was “walking” water because I was too tired to run with the bucket), no telephone and not even a road. We soon built a nice “path room.” That was my dream home for thirteen years until we moved into a twenty-two room, three story house with four complete bathrooms for the next fifteen years. I loved those two houses. This time we created a home for sojourners called a Bed and Breakfast.
All of these years the work at Lend-a-Hand Center was my day job. Finally in 2005 circumstances called me back to moving the three-room cabin to The Center and create a comfortable house. “So Much” soon became my dream house, but I really liked each house and hated to move away. Now it seems time to return to the home community in Indiana, not to my childhood house, but certainly my childhood church and family. So this year the song, “I’ll be home for Christmas” takes on new meaning for me.